Ford Puma 1.0 Ecoboost 155 ST-Line X 2020 review

Keen drivers, rejoice: the compact crossover finally has a class leader capable of appealing to petrolheads (and mild-hybridheads)

For quite a long time, we’ve been waiting for somebody to come along and set a new standard – any kind of standard – in the compact crossover segment.Finally, I think we’ve found the car that has done it, although the new Ford Puma has stepped rather than vaulted over what’s a relatively modest bar.Puma, then. No longer a stylish small coupé based on the Fiesta, but today’s equivalent: a tall pseudo-SUV based on the Fiesta. We’ll mourn the former kind of Puma but, well, if we wanted to keep cars like that in production, we should have bought more of the darned things. The truth is that the crossover is the mainstream manufacturer’s way to make money out of passenger cars and not just vans.So let’s size it up: the new Puma is 54mm taller than a Fiesta (1537mm), a full 146mm longer (4185mm) with a 95mm-longer wheelbase (2588mm) and, perhaps most significant, 71mm wider (1805mm). I say significant because the problem with many crossovers is that, in trying to give them some kind of dynamism, their suspension is tied down so the ride is hard. The Puma’s track width is 58mm wider than on the Fiesta on which it is based, and a bit of additional width should offset some of the extra height when it comes to the increased centre of gravity. We’ll see.Mechanically, things are pretty straightforward. Every Puma is a 1.0-litre petrol at the minute, with a 1.5 diesel following and a hot version (I know, but if anyone can, Ford probably can) later still. The three-cylinder 1.0 comes in four different flavours: 94bhp and 123bhp pure internal combustion, and 123bhp and 153bhp mild hybrid.It’s a very mild hybrid, basically an integrated starter/generator aimed at torque-filling the turbo lag at low revs and helping to reduce the CO2 figures, rather than making the Puma faster – although it does, a tiny bit. Producing 15bhp and 37lb ft, though, and mostly at low revs, not by much. Ford calls the system ‘mHEV’, whose capitals put rather too much emphasis on the ‘hybrid electric vehicle’ part of things and not enough on the ‘mild’ element, for me. Reminds me of the gambling industry’s ‘when the fun stops, stop’ campaign with ‘FUN’ written largest. This isn’t a car that ever goes anywhere under electric power alone, after all. Still, it all helps the numbers, and Ford thinks that by 2022 more than half of the cars it sells will be some kind of electrified. No news yet on a battery-electric or a plug-in electric hybrid version of the Puma.There is room, though, for a bigger battery than the diddy li-ion one beneath the boot floor, an area that Ford is reserving for a few things: on pure-combustion cars, the option of a spare wheel (praise be). And on starter/generator cars, what it calls a ‘Megabox’. Don’t get too excited. But it’s a novel way of using some space.The Puma gets a higher boot floor than a Fiesta, and if a battery isn’t taking up the whole space, you might as well use it for something. Here, it’s a square 80-litre plastic recess with a plughole in the bottom, so – finally – there’s a car with a place to put dirty boots that you can easily rinse out afterwards. And, I guess, Ford could just offer different box sizes played off against different batteries back there.Anyway, I’ve tried the Puma in 153bhp form, and in ST-Line X trim, which is fairly near the top of the tree. Prices start at just over £20,000 but this one’s £23,645, for a car that can reach 62mph in 9.0sec and return 51mpg, according to its combined WLTP fuel cycle.

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